Library PokeNight

Pokenight

Last night we held our first Library PokeNight and it turned out to be one of my most successful programs! 18 people showed up (22 if you count staff who stopped by), it was a good mix of teens and younger adults. The goal was to capitalize on the fact that we are a Pokemon Go PokeStop and it worked! So, what did Library PokeNight consist of?

  • A PokeWalk around the downtown area where our library is located. You can hit three stops from our library – so we started there (one of my coworkers also dropped lures on all three stops).  This went very well and we picked up some people along the route who just happened to be out and about catching Pokemon.
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Our PokeStop.

  • Pokemon button-making. We made team badges and I had a variety of Pokemon art to choose from.
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Team Mystic, FTW! 

  • Pokeball cookie decorating. This is a very easy edible craft. You just need sugar cookies, frosting, and mini-marshmallows. My coworker and I divided up all the frosting and supplies beforehand to save time and avoid a clogged line at the cookie table.
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Gotta eat ’em all!

In addition to the Library PokeNight event, I’m doing a couple passive activities.

  • Draw your favorite Pokemon on the whiteboard.
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Pacmon is pretty sweet.

  • DIY Pikachu & Pokeball. I printed off the Cubeecraft templates and set them out in the Teen Zone with scissors and glue. It’s been pretty popular with patrons of all ages.
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Too cute!

 

What is your library doing to attract Pokemon Go players?

 

Hosting a Galentine’s Day Party at the Library

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Image credit: Giphy

What’s Galentine’s Day? It’s only the greatest day of the year! Galentine’s Day is a holiday created by Parks & Recreation character, Leslie Knope. It takes place on February 13th and is all about ladies celebrating ladies… breakfast-style.

As I was brainstorming ideas for February programs, I decided to eschew the typical Valentine’s Day party (I already had Blind Date with a Book planned for that) and throw a Galentine’s Day party. When I mentioned it to my after-school crowd, they were thrilled. However, since it was on a Saturday, only three of them showed up. It was still a blast, though! We had waffles, made friendship bracelets, and (per their request) watched some French cartoon about a ladybug girl.

The cost of the program wasn’t too outrageous. I spent about $25 on food and craft supplies. I highly recommend throwing your own library Galentine’s Day party next year!

Spark a Reaction – 2014 Teen Summer Reading Program

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It’s hard to believe that Summer Reading is almost here (or already here for some of you). Teen programs are on hiatus for the month of June at my library because bridesmaid duties are taking over my life, but our Summer Reading Program will start up July 1st. This year I’m doing things a little differently. Instead of using BINGO cards and doing random drawings each week, I’ve created a book log. Teens will keep track of all the titles they read in July (including fan fiction), whoever reads the most books wins the grand prize. If they read five books, they will earn a prize and an invitation to the after-hours awards party.

I’ve also got lots of activities planned: two LEGO robotics classes, crafts, weekly movies, and a video-making club. My book club teens have been begging to make a movie, so I’m making their dreams come true. I have some video-editing experience, but we all be learning together (which is fun).

Here are some of the handouts I’ve created for SRP packets this year:

Calendar of Events

Reading Log

Recommended Reading List

I would love to hear what other librarians have planned for this summer. Tell me in the comments!

Awesome Readers’ Club – Uglies

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This month, ARC is reading Uglies by Scott Westerfeld. This is my second go at Uglies, I didn’t finish it the first time around. I don’t remember why. In addition to discussion, I have a couple other activities planned: the Opening Lines Matching Game and it’s time for us to select more books to read (yay!). For book selections, I generally let everyone write down suggestions to put in a basket and then we pull titles at random. We then look up a description of the titles pulled and vote on whether or not the club wants to read it. We will choose about 6 books at a time. I also put a few titles into the basket (which is how we ended up reading The Name of the Star last year). The teens enjoy this method because everyone gets to be involved in selection and they feel like their voices get heard.

On to the discussion questions. This month I’ll be using questions that Mr. Westerfeld himself wrote (found on his blog).

*WARNING: POSSIBLE SPOILERS AHEAD*

1. Have you ever had a friend like Peris, who abandoned your friendship after they moved away?

2. At first, did you hope Tally would get the operation? When did you change your mind? (Or did you?)

3. Have you ever found yourself trusting someone more or paying more attention to what they said not because they deserved it, but just because of their looks?

4. In what ways did Tally’s trip through the wild prepare her for what she learned in the Smoke?

5. Would you give up your ability to think independently in exchange for being happy, beautiful, perpetually healthy, and rich?

6. How did David see Tally differently than she saw herself?

7. If Shay could have gone back in time and never have met Tally, do you think she would?

8. Other than the pretty operation, what are the main differences between the pretty society and our own? (Are there any ways in which the pretty society is healthier than ours?)

9. To what extent did Tally decide her own fate, and how much did other people decide it for her?

10. The Rusty civilization collapsed because of its dependence on oil. In what ways is your lifestyle dependent on oil and gasoline? How easily would you survive if it all disappeared one day?

Paperback Wallet Craft

Paperback Wallet CraftMy regular teens seem to really enjoy destroying old books when we do crafts. My most popular crafternoon to date was a hollowed book. I guess it seems taboo to them, being in the library and all. Since they love cutting up books so much, I’ve been trying to think of a new upcycle craft for them. Before I took over teen programs, I made a paperback wallet for a friend for their birthday and he loved it. It seems like the perfect project for our teens. I tweaked the process a little to incorporate another teen favorite (duct tape) and to simplify it.

Supply Costs:

Paperbacks – $0, I plan to use recently weeded items.

Duct tape – $0, still have lots on hand from another crafternoon.

Contact paper – $0, the PR Manager had some lying around (way to go, Julie!)

Adhesive Velcro – $0, more leftovers.

Scissors – $0, a library programmer’s pantry necessity.

Pens – $0, we’re going use some from the stockpile of promotional pens.

Total Supply Costs: $0!!!! My favorite kind of craft is the craft that uses up all my leftover supplies (the director loves that, too). If I had to guestimate the cost of supplies if you don’t have leftovers, I would say $20-30 for approximately 10 teens. Just depends on where you shop and the brands you purchase (tip: always go off-brand).

Total Craft Time: 30-45 minutes.

Here are the Paperback Wallet instructions.

Awesome Readers’ Club – The Disreputable History of Frankie Landau-Banks

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For this month’s ARC, we’re reading The Disreputable History of Frankie Landau-Banks by E. Lockhart. I basically forced this book upon them because I love it. Actually, I’ve liked almost all of E. Lockhart’s books (I wasn’t wild about  Fly on the Wall or Dramarama, but loved all of the Ruby Oliver books and I’m really looking forward to We Were Liars). In addition to discussion, I’m going to give the teens special mustaches to place on their favorite books throughout the stacks (kind of a little prank of our own because it will confuse any other patron that picks the book up).

Here are the discussions questions to go with The Disreputable History of Frankie Landau-Banks, which I got from Hyperion Discussion GuideThe questions may contain spoilers, so reader beware.  

  1. Frankie undergoes both a physical and an emotional transformation in the book. Why do you think people only recognize one of them? Is it difficult for women who are beautiful to be taken seriously? Why?
  2. How does Frankie first meet Alpha? Why doesn’t he acknowledge their chance encounter? Matthew, too, has no memory of having met Frankie. How does this make her feel? Would you ave handled this situation similarly, or not? Why?
  3. Why do you think the author chose a boarding school as the setting for the novel “that patriarchal establishment, the insular, over-privileged life”? How does the setting add to the conflicts and development of Frankie’s story? What is the most interesting thing about Alabaster?
  4. Discuss Frankie’s romance with Porter. Do you think this contributed to what happens with Matthew?
  5. Frankie gains not only a boyfriend but a whole posse of charming boys to hang out with, too. Why is this group so much fun for her to hang around with? Why does she find it a bit scary to invest so much of her energy into this group?
  6. Frankie learns about the theory of a panopticon in her favorite class. Do you agree with the theory that most people behave because they have this sense of being monitored? Do you think this sense prevails in modern life even more than in previous times? How? Why? Does it influence your own behavior? How?
  7. Why do you think secret societies exist at all? What does Frankie learn about the Bassets as the novel progresses? Why do you think she’s unable to just let it go?
  8. Frankie weighs everything before she says it and considers her options before she speaks. Are you able to do this? Do you wish you could? Do you think most people consider their words before speaking? Are you clever or funny like Frankie? How do people develop wit?
  9. Over the course of the novel Frankie seems to get more and more angry about how other people perceive her. She’s tired of pretending to be just one thing. Have you ever felt this rage against expectations? What did you do about it? What does Frankie do?
  10. Which of the pranks did you find the most compelling? Have you ever been a prankster? What does Frankie learn about herself as she plans and executes the pranks? How does it change everyone’s perception of her?
  11. Frankie also rails against the unwritten codes of her school, such as who gets to sit at the senior table. What are the unwritten codes and rules at your own school? Has anyone ever tried to defy them? What were the consequences?
  12. Describe Frankie’s romance with Matthew. Who would you say is in control of the relationship? Why? How does it end between them? Do you think Matthew is justified in his feelings? Do you think he was ever really in love with Frankie to begin with? Why?
  13. Frankie wants Matthew to “. . . admire her cleverness, her ambition, her vision. That he would admit her as his equal, or even as his superior, and love her for what she was capable of.” Do you think this is even possible in teen relationships? Is it possible in life? How many marriages that you know operate under this banner?
  14. How do the others react when they learn she was the mastermind behind the pranks? Why were they it considered “brilliant” when the Bassets thought Alpha was in charge, but “psychotic” when Frankie is revealed as the perpetrator?
  15. In the end, Frankie concludes, “It is better to be alone, than to be with someone who can’t see who you are.” Do you agree with her? Do your friends and romantic partners see who you really are or only who they expect and want you to be? What don’t you reveal to your friends and family? Do you think men or women share their true selves more with others? Why?